Month: November 2015

Call for members of new Participant Panel

Joining the Participant Panel

We are looking for people who have taken part in the 100,000 Genomes Project to join our national Participant Panel. The 100,000 Genomes Project is a landmark project in healthcare which has the potential to bring personalised medicine to the NHS. This new panel will help shape it’s future.

The role of the Participant Panel is to ensure the interests of participants are always at the centre of the 100,000 Genomes Project. They will do this by:

  • Making sure that the experiences of participants are improved.
  • Responding to feedback.
  • Overseeing who should have access to participant data.

Who can be a member of the panel?

Family with boy with disability

Anyone who has taken part in the 100,000 Genomes Project can be on the panel. Carers of people who have taken part are also welcome. We would like participants from both the cancer and rare disease parts of the Project.

Members should be able to put themselves into other people’s shoes, and see the point of view of other participants as well as using their own experiences.

What will it involve?

The panel will meet twice a year in London. This is likely to be a ½ day meeting. Those who are unable to join meetings in person can join by telephone or Skype. There are likely to be documents to read or consider before any meetings. There may also be follow up work. Documents and paperwork will usually be sent by email.

We hope the panel will shape their own work and define their own responsibilities. All members will be expected to contribute their ideas and experiences to the panel.

Some panel members will also sit on other committees in Genomics England. These include:

Panel members who also sit on these committees will need to attend extra meetings.

The Access Review Committee (ARC) is an independent advisory body for the 100,000 Genomes Project. It examines requests for access to data in the project.

The ARC approves, declines, or amends requests for access to data in the 100,000 Genomes Project. Decisions take into account many factors including the nature of the research and the risk of identifiability.  External sources of expertise may be called to help the decision-making process.

The Genomics England Clinical Interpretation Partnership is overseen by the GeCIP Board. This is Chaired by Professor Dame Kay Davies, who also sits on the Board of Genomics England.

The main roles of the GeCIP Board are:

  • To oversee and coordinate the clinical interpretation programme.
  • To sponsor a twice yearly conference of all active GeCIP members.
  • To receive advice from Genomics England Advisory Committees.
  • To provide advice to the Genomics England Board.

Are expenses paid?

Panel members will be paid for their time and reasonable expenses will be covered. We will provide support and training for everyone on the panel.

How to apply

Please download the role description for more information.

Please email if you are interested in joining the Panel. In your email, please outline why you are interested in this role. Please also include how you are involved in the 100,000 Genomes Project. Finally, please include your name and contact details.

You can contact us on if you have any questions.

Genomics England Contracts with WuXi NextCODE as Clinical Interpretation Partner in both Rare Disease and Cancer

NEXTCODEGenomics England has today announced that it has contracted with WuXi NextCODE as a Clinical Interpretation Partner for the 100,000 Genomes Project. The China, US and Iceland-based company is the first to work with them on cancer samples and will also interpret samples in rare disease. Genomics England will work with the clinical interpretation partners to drive up the quality of interpretation of genomic data. This will lead to better understanding of disease and more personalised care for patients in the future.

The Project aims to sequence 100,000 whole genomes from approximately 70,000 people. Participants are NHS patients with a rare disease plus their families, and patients with cancer. The aim is to create a new genomic medicine service for the NHS, leading to more personalised care for patients. Some patients with rare disease may get a diagnosis for the first time, or discover what treatment might work best for them.

Their (WuXi NextCODE) sequence analysis platform will help us to make a direct impact on patient care.

WuXi NextCODE’s unique database model and clinical and tumor-normal analysis and reporting systems will enable NHS clinicians to begin to efficiently analyse patient sequence data and identify causative variants in rare diseases and driver mutations in tumors.

Dr Augusto Rendon, Director of Bioinformatics at Genomics England said: “We are delighted to be working with WuXi NextCODE. Their sequence analysis platform will help us to return high quality variant interpretation results back to clinicians and make a direct impact on patient care.”

Hannes Smarason, President and COO of WuXi NextCODE, a wholly owned subsidiary of WuXi AppTec (NYSE:WX), said: “We are very pleased to be playing a central role in a project that is a driving force for precision medicine worldwide. We look forward to putting our technology to work for NHS patients through interpretation and by applying the knowledge gained to advance the development of targeted new therapies for cancer and a range of rare conditions.”

Genomics England Selects Cognizant as a Technology Partner for the 100,000 Genomes Project

Genomics England has selected Cognizant as a technology partner to help design and implement the IT operating environment for the 100,000 Genomes Project.

Cognizant The 100,000 Genomes Project aims to sequence 100,000 whole genomes from NHS patients and their families, of which around 70,000 are participants with certain types of cancer or rare diseases. The project aims to enable new scientific discovery, medical insights and diagnostics. When completed, the NHS will be able to offer genomic medicine and personalised treatments to patients with conditions that are currently hard to treat.

As part of a two-year agreement, Cognizant will help provide end-to-end systems integration and analytics services for the technology platform built by Genomics England. This will enable Genomics England to augment its capability and capacity to process samples and interpret findings. An improved technology backbone supported by advanced analytics will also help Genomics England optimise its business processes and simplify the management and analysis of clinical, laboratory and health data.

We selected Cognizant for its extensive life sciences capabilities, knowledge of research… and experience in working with the UK public sector organisations.

“Combining genomic sequence data with medical records is a ground-breaking initiative. Researchers will study how best to use genomics in healthcare and interpret the data to help patients,” said David Brown, Head of Informatics Infrastructure, Genomics England. “We selected Cognizant for its extensive life sciences capabilities, knowledge of research, management and analysis of clinical data sets, and experience in working with the UK public sector organisations.”

“Large-scale sequencing initiatives like the UK’s 100,000 Genomes Project require a flexible, secure operating platform to help drive innovation in new diagnostic and treatment options for patients and healthcare providers,” said Bhaskar Sambasivan, Vice President of Cognizant’s Life Sciences practice. “Our culture of investing in understanding our customers’ businesses, deep programme management expertise in the healthcare and life sciences industry, and robust system integration and business analytics capabilities enable us to deliver a broad range of solutions for Genomics England as it creates genome sequences and clinical data at an unprecedented scale.”